eHealth News, South Africa

Yono Fertility Wearable Hits the Market

The Yono wearable, which aims to help women understand their ovulation cycles and predict their fertility window, is now shipping.

Yono - EHN

Following a successful Kickstarter campaign, the Yono wearable, which aims to help women understand their ovulation cycles and predict their fertility window, is now shipping.

A reported one in eight couples have trouble conceiving or sustaining a pregnancy, and the demand for tools for better understanding fertility has been high.

The in-ear wearable is worn during the night to measure and continuously track a woman’s basal body temperature (BBT), predicting when the wearer is most fertile and likely to conceive.

After a night of wearing the Yono, users connect the wearable device to their smartphones and data automatically syncs into an iOS or Android app. Users can also choose to sync data with Apple’s HealthKit.

“After many months of engineering efforts, the Yono is now shipping to our Kickstarter backers,” said CEO and Founder of Yono Labs, Vanessa Xi.

The company first shipped the Yono wearables earlier in July to their Kickstarter backers and will also be shipping to customers who pre-ordered on the company’s web site.

“It has been very challenging to build the world’s smallest wearable, making it a comfortable, accurate and convenient device that can fit in the ear. Yono is more powerful than traditional thermometers and we are very excited that our first customers will be able to start learning about their cycles from our device,” continued Xi.

According to the start-up, traditional methods of measuring BBT require women to wake up at the same time every morning and go through a complicated process of data collection.

Yono’s campaign on Kickstarter, which debuted in August 2015 and ran for 45 days, raised $53,000.

Yono says it plans to work with other health and wellness apps. In the future the wearable will get even smarter and may be used to continuously measure vital signs like heart rate, blood pressure and blood oxygen data.

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